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Google Keep colour codes

Google Keep was one of my big takeaways from last year’s EdTechTeam Melbourne Summit (are you coming to this year’s?). I’d been hearing about it for a while but I thought it was just Google’s version of Evernote and, as a huge Evernote fan and continuing user, I figured it was one less thing I needed to know about.

How wrong was I!

It turns out Keep is a complement to Evernote, not a rival or alternative. While Evernote is fantastic for organising study notes, managing research; storing, annotating and searching PDFs, generally anything you want to keep long term; Keep is better suited to those short term items. You know, the ones we use sticky notes for in the analog world.

Anyway, I’m now a big Google Keep fan and I promote it to teachers and students to help them get organised too.

Being a serial organiser I love the colour coding feature and have set up a system for my personal Keep account and a different one for my work one. I put a pinned note with my colour codes explained (plain white, all text – how dull!) on each account. All good, sort of.

Inspired by Kasey Bell I started adding images to notes like my ongoing to-do lists (one for my current study subject and one that is just general stuff) but with Kasey’s inspiration I’ve now used Canva to create a colourful customised note to explain my colour-code system.

Here’s the before and after for my personal account:

GK colour code text version GK Colour code colour version

So much better!

If I needed more categories I could have used grey (how dull!) and no colour (aka white) but six is enough for me. Any finer categorising I need to do can be done with Keep’s labels.

So now my gift for you!

The category image was created in two steps using Canva. First I created an image with the six colours but no text. I downloaded that as a png and then uploaded it back into Canva where I added the category text over the top of each colour, I then repeated the steps to create a different version for my other account. To save you the trouble of identifying the hex codes for the six colours and adding the shapes to a rectangle on Canva, here is that image. Feel free to download and do whatever you like with it!Google Keep Colour coder - no text

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New and interesting links (weekly)

  • At the 2014 Literacy Research Association meeting in Dallas, TX I had the opportunity to facilitate and present in a “Pecha Kucha” style session. For those of you that are not familiar with pecha kucha, based on the Japanese for the sound of conversation, it is a presentation methodology in which 20 slides are shown for 20 seconds each (6 minutes and 40 seconds in total). The format utilizes images more than words, keeps presentations concise and fast-paced, powers multiple-speaker events, keeps the interest level up, and gives more people the chance to present

    tags: presentation presentation tools teachmeet

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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New and interesting links (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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New and interesting links (weekly)

  • One of the recurring themes (from many different contributors) on the LSE Impact of Social Science blog is that a new paradigm of research communications has grown up — one that de-emphasizes the traditional journals route, and re-prioritizes faster, real-time academic communication. Blogs play a critical intermediate role. They link to research reports and articles on the one hand, and they are linked to from Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr and Google+ news-streams and communities. So in research terms blogging is quite simply, one of the most important things that an academic should be doing right now

    tags: INF530 blogging research

  • The Encyclopedia of Earth (EoE) is an electronic reference about the Earth, its natural environments, and their interaction with society. The EoE is a free, expert-reviewed collection of content contributed by scholars, professionals, educators, practitioners and other experts who collaborate and review each other’s work. The content is presented in a style intended to be useful to students, educators, scholars, professionals, as well as to the general public.

    tags: encyclopedia environment creative commons science KDSBytes

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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New and interesting links (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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New and interesting links (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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New and interesting links (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.